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that many electronic devices continue to consume some power even when they are turned off). One way to eliminate standby power is to use a power bar or surge protector with a built in switch to turn off connected devices completely, but these are annoying and rarely get used in practice for 2 reasons:1. Power bars are usually located under desks or are otherwise obstructed making the switches difficult to access.2. I can turn off just the outlets I want with a switch placed exactly where I want it. See examples of some of my remote switch installations below. Most power bars already have an illuminated switch. You could simplify this project by simply relocating that switch remotely, but I prefer to have a remote switch that only controls some of the outlets on the power bar allowing others to be “always on”.2. Costs for Digikey components decrease with quantity. It will also take you less time per unit if you build several at once. I purchased 10 each of the switches and enclosures for this reason.3. This particular power bar was for a computer, so I used a surge protected power bar. The switch also contains a light. Scribe an outline with these dimensions on the side of the housing. Then use an exacto knife to carefully cut away the plastic to the scribe line. Pre tin the wire ends and switch terminals with solder. Others are not easily opened. They may be glued or riveted closed. Where is a good place to drill a hole through the side for your remote switch cord to enter?2. Where is the hot wire (black) that feeds the group of outlets you would like to control?3. If the desired location is right on the seam where the two halves of the power bar housing meet, just reassemble the power bar before drilling. Cut the hot wire (black) in the power bar that you chose in an earlier step. Make sure the black cord wire goes to the hot side of the black cut wire in the power bar. Assume further that the equipment is in use 40 hours a week (an office computer setup for example). Therefore, there are 128 hours a week when the equipment would normally have been in standby mode. That corresponds to 99.84 kWh per year. At roughly $0.07 per kWh (the price where I live), that is a savings of about $7.00 per year. Therefore the time till payback on materials alone is at least a couple years. It’s probably 5 6 years if you value your own time at a reasonable rate. But it does pay back eventually, and if you are running a lot of equipment (for example if you have a home business) the savings start to become significant. There’s also the convenience and coolness factor of turning off multiple pieces of equipment with a custom mounted illuminated switch. Honestly.

Ask Question33 Commentsbellyr68 4 years agoReply

I find out this product at Amazon, this works just great! Watchdog timers, grouping for the outlets for reboot/timers. Everything you need in a fancy pants power strip. Only lacks power usage monitoring, and environmental probes. And would be great if it did my laundry, but alas it only saves me truck rolls. Good article!

Overall,
ugg knitted boots Make Your Own Remote Power Switches
this is a good idea, however, there are a few issues with killing all power to electronics that should be remembered.1. computers : if i recal correctly, the BIOS battery is only under load when the computer is unplugged. Therefore, killing power to the computer would shorten the life of the bios battery (which is needed for power outages, upgrades, and moves) a dead BIOS battery can be a real bummer when they’re soldered in, or in an impossible clip, and your power goes out2. stereo equipment on most equipment, clocks and presets are dead without standby. if not, your running a battery (or using non volatile memory, which is rare). In the long run, you’re creating hazardous waste by killing batteries prematurely. 3. TV say goodbye to channel programming and time. I’d hate to reset those everytime i wanna watch tv.4. everything else wall warts / cheap transformers are your biggest waste, in my experience. separating those out and switching only those would save almost as much electricity (imho) without the frustration. unless you have wall warts for any of the above devices. the best solution would be a less wasteful transformer to replace all your wall warts. I’ll see what I can do.
ugg knitted boots Make Your Own Remote Power Switches